Episode 3: Don’t Judge what others eat

don't judge

Welcome to Episode 3.

In this episode we look at 10 Simple Rules for Healthy Eating.

Number 10 – Don’t judge what others eat.

People are very different. Some may have real problems consuming even the smallest amount of carbohydrates. Others may be intolerant of certain foods because of allergies or sensitivities. It will most likely take a bit of experimentation, on an individual level, to find the actual diet within these recommendations that works for you. But the 10 simple rules should allow for a wide variety of foods and for remaining healthy.

Humans have a tendency to tribalism.  This has deep historical and social roots.  It has both positive and negative ramifications.  Positive tribalism can be in terms of providing support and encouragement to the ‘in’ members.  Don’t under appreciate the importance of this support and encouragement.  Those who have a weight loss goal, for example, can really get a huge amount of assistance from peers.

Negative tribalism can manifest in terms of distancing the ‘out’ members. Think suggesting going to a burger joint with vegans, bringing a perfectly healthy salad to a barbecue or suggesting an alcohol-free Friday night with office colleagues. Snarky comments, judgemental looks and general social discomfort can result.  The stronger forms can result in elitism, and even shunning of the ‘outsider’.

don't judge

A great article from Psychology Today goes into detail on In-groups, out-groups, and the psychology of crowds.

The main takeaway is this:

  • Recognize the arbitrary nature of many ingroup-outgroup distinctions
  • Put yourself in the place of the outgroup member
  • Look for commonalities between opposing group
  • Work on building your inner sense of security
  • Pass along the lesson

At the end of the day, you need to do what’s right for you.  Friends will support you.  Detractors will malign you.  You don’t have as big an effect on the views of others as you may think.  The only person you can consistently change is yourself.  So, just make sure you’re doing what you’re doing for good reasons and always be prepared to (re)evaluate challenges to your viewpoint.  Above all, don’t force your culinary views on to others.  Don’t judge what others eat.

Full article: www.eat-real-food.com.au/10-simple-rules-for-healthy-eating

Further reading:

Wikipedia overview of Ingroups and Outgroups
McLeod, S. A. (2008). Social Identity Theory. Retrieved from www.simplypsychology.org/social-identity-theory.html

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Tim Brown
Tim is passionate about fitness and health. Combining his love of Martial Arts and Fitness, Tim founded FunFit: Functional Fitness & Self Defence Centre in 2008 and from 2012 has been a student of Nutrition. Eat Real Food is Tim's vision (with help!) to better inform people about healthy food choices. With so many messages out there (often conflicting), Tim thought "wouldn't it be great if there was a site that people could go to that cut through jargon and marketing-speak and just made it easier to make healthy choices?" Enter Eat Real Food. Be warned: Tim is (in)famous for good information and bad jokes. He may also overuse parentheses.

Tim Brown

Tim is passionate about fitness and health. Combining his love of Martial Arts and Fitness, Tim founded FunFit: Functional Fitness & Self Defence Centre in 2008 and from 2012 has been a student of Nutrition. Eat Real Food is Tim's vision (with help!) to better inform people about healthy food choices. With so many messages out there (often conflicting), Tim thought "wouldn't it be great if there was a site that people could go to that cut through jargon and marketing-speak and just made it easier to make healthy choices?" Enter Eat Real Food. Be warned: Tim is (in)famous for good information and bad jokes. He may also overuse parentheses.

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